Workers often underestimate the dangers of a short fall, even while they understand that falls themselves are one of the greatest risks that they face on the job. Many just assume that “a fall” means a fall from at least a second level to a first level, which tends to be about 8-10 feet. 

The truth, though, is that even a short fall, say from five feet or less, can lead to serious injuries. It’s not just the window washer on the 10th story or the roofer climbing a 30-foot ladder who faces risks. The electrician installing a light or the painter painting a ceiling could also get badly injured in a fall. 

Remember, you can suffer serious head injuries even if you simply slip and fall from no additional height at all. If you’re unable to catch yourself and your head strikes a hard surface, you can have a skull fracture, a traumatic brain injury or some other such issue that changes your quality of life or perhaps puts your very life in jeopardy. 

As you can imagine, that risk is simply greater when the height is higher. A worker who slips on a five-foot ladder trying to reach something overhead may rotate in the air so that they land on their head and neck. This awkward type of fall is very hard to catch, especially with tools in hand. That puts all of the worker’s own weight, compounded by the distance of the fall, on some of the most fragile parts of their body. 

Not only must you always understand the risks posed by a fall, but you also need to know what options you have after a serious injury. Don’t let anyone talk you out of filing a claim for fair compensation. Find out how an experienced advocate can help you.